Posts Tagged ‘Zoom lens’

There’s a direct relationship to how much depth of field is created in a photo to the focal length of the lens, the aperture at which the photo is made, how close the subject is to the background, how far away the subject is from the camera, and how much the subject is magnified.

Focal Length – the more telephoto the lens, the less potential for near to far depth of field. The wider the lens, the greater the potential. For instance, an image made with a 28mm lens will inherently display more depth of field than a 100mm lens. So if you want to create shallow depth of field and you’re using a wide lens, it may not be possible. If you’re using a telephoto lens and you want to a subject close to the lens and a distant object to both be in focus, it may not be possible.

The Aperture – the wider open the lens, the less depth of field. The more it’s stopped down, the greater the depth of field. In other words, f4 will net shallower depth of field than f22 based on a given focal length. It’s important to realize the connection to focal length as explained above. If you’re using a telephoto lens, even though you set it to f22, you still may not be able to achieve near/far depth of field. Understanding how focal length and aperture go hand in hand is key!

Proximity to the Background – The farther away the subject is from the background, the more the background can be thrown out of focus. If the subject is very close to the background, it’s not possible to make the background go very soft even if you use a super telephoto lens and set the aperture to f4.

Distance From The Camera – If the subject is very close to the camera and the focus point is placed on the subject, there’s more potential to create shallow depth of field than if the subject is 25 or more feet away. Again, there’s a relationship to the focal length of the lens, the aperture at which it’s set and how far the background is from the subject.

Subject Magnification – The more macro the subject, the less depth of field. This area of depth of field is more specialized and it really is a subject unto itself but I just wanted to bring it up to let you know it’s a variable.

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Lens types are classified as “Prime” which comes with fixed focal length and “Zoom” which has variable focal length.

English: A Nikon D300s with Zoom-Nikkor 18-135...

Image via Wikipedia

  • Prime includes sub group of Standard (35- 80mm), Wide-Angle (15-28mm), Macro (50-100mm), Telephoto (80-300mm) and Super Telephoto lenses (200-400mm).
  • Zoom comes with variations like: Wide-Angle to Telephoto or Standard to Telephoto coverage. Even the point and shoot type of digital camera  comes with a Standard 35-80mm lens. A Standard lens is also known as “normal-lens” the term “normal” is used for this type because it captures a scene just as the human eye sees it. A Standard lens is great for everyday shots, such as flowers, people, or pets.

Wide-angle gives a broader view of a scene than a standard lens does. Because this lens captures a wide area it is used for photographing groups of people and landscapes.

Telephoto is used to enlarge pictures or for bringing distant subjects closer. A common telephoto comes with 75-300 mm coverage. When you begin to move from the 35mm into something larger it is best to either use a tripod or a stabilizer. A stabilizer will help you hold the camera steady for clear shots even if your hand moves a little bit.

Super telephoto comes with 200-400mm lens. It is mostly used for capturing wild life or birds.

A Macro lens is designed to capture a tiny subject as a bigger image. Macro photography is a type of shooting that magnifies
the size of a subject. As it name implies it is great for close up shots, such as flowers, spider webs, insects and other small objects.

Digital zoom simply crops the image to a smaller size, and then enlarges the cropped portion to fill the frame.

Optical zoom works just like a digital zoom. The lens changes focal length and increase magnification as it is zoomed.

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