Posts Tagged ‘Design’

Typography:This is how you apply and produce your text to appear with a final result that complements your images and design of the total media material, whether it is for print, web or mobile.

S long serif et sans serif

S long serif et sans serif (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dealing with typography, here are some of the common rules to abide by.

Rule # 1- Don’t use all the fonts in one document.

Most designers have his or her own accumulation of fonts, which he or she applies to each design project. Apart from the fonts in the software program being used, virtually all designers possess their own lists that are expanded to the already existing list. And since because of the availability of so many fonts, one perhaps may be lured to use as a lot of, if not all of the fonts that he or she has. Remember that simple is to a greater extent more attractive than confusion and disarray. Once you begin employing a lot of different fonts in a document, the content becomes lost in the clutter. Additionally, too many fonts can distract the reader from the real aim of the design to get a message across. All the same, this does not mean that you have got to be boring and tiresome by adhering to the established “two-font rule”, which says that you had to accept one font for headings and a different one for text. So where’s the creativeness in that? Make sure to have a reason why you prefer to deviate from the rule and decide to employ fonts.

Rule # 2- “Serif fonts are easier on the eyes than Sans Serif.”

SANS-SERIFS MOURNFUL LETTER

SANS-SERIFS MOURNFUL LETTER (Photo credit: Nick Sherman)

Sans serif type is frequently applied for headings and short numbers of text. All fonts can be made clear with a good design. With sans serif though it calls for further leading than serif type, it can present your documents with a very modernistic appearance, and is the most popular body text.

Rule # 3- Positioning two spaces after a period is a no-no.

In the past when typewriters were the thing for writers, two spaces after a period was the rule to show the close of a sentence. The onset of technology, have fonts making characters of their own, with different widths, that placing two spaces after a period is no longer needed. Occasionally, this rule could produce a quite irritating defect that makes a stop instead of helping you pinpoint the close of every sentence.

Rule # 4- Don’t use all capital letters.
One person said that while employing all capitals in the text, there are no ascenders or descenders. The two are what makes it easy to distinguish the anatomy of a word. “The anatomy of just about every word converts to a rectangle, and it’s tougher to read.” This does not mean that you can’t use capital letters. Short words or headings do appear attractive in all caps. Sans serif also acts better entirely in caps.

 
Rule # 5- Don’t center large amounts of text.
The eyes move from left to right while reading. They quickly glance over one line, then move from the right side of the page back to the left side of the page. Once the text is centered, it makes it more difficult for the eyes to find where the next text starts over again on the left side of the page, and makes it easy for the reader to skim down the lines of text. The most effective method is still to save centering to headings that do not go further than several lines deep.

Using proper typography methods can greatly enhance the look of any printed piece, web site or mobile application.

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Graphic design is a field that is quickly changing, both creatively and technically, and while it is easy to get caught up in learning new technical skills, it is just as important to focus improving and pushing the limits of our creativity.

Here are a few tips, exercises and practices that have helped me continue learning, strengthen creativity and become an all around better designer.

Become a collector
Each time you see a design that inspires you, collect it, bring it home and file it away. I have hundreds of brochures, posters and other collateral that I have collected over the years that is stacked away in folders and boxes that I can quickly access, a great source of inspiration when needed.

Buy books
Having an extensive book collection is always essential to learning. I try buying a new book at least every 2-3 weeks that range from inspirational, educational and technical topics.

Read design-related blogs
I can’t stress enough how much information I have learned by reading other great designers blogs. The web is an invaluable resource of information, take advantage of it and actually use it!

Start a design blog
Having started my blog only a month ago, I have found it to be extremely useful and educational for myself. It has made me more aware of the design community and more analytical of my own work.

Join and be active in the design community
As a designer, joining the online design community is a must. Not only does it keep you up-to-date in the design world, but is also great for feedback and critique.

Network with other designers
I always try to search out the designers that have more experience and talent than I do. I know – it’s hard to admit someone else is better than you, but networking with people of higher skill levels will push you to work harder and learn more.

Take lots of photos
Pictures of building designs, textures, shapes of shadows on walls, etc. Basically anything that interests me from a design stand point.

Create fake projects
Whenever I find myself with free time I create fake projects. Create a fake brand for a company. Design a logo, stationary, brochure, website. It’s good to do this once in awhile because it keeps design fun and let’s your creativity run wild without limitations. It’s often easy to get caught in a rut when clients start dictating and your work no longer becomes “yours”.

Redo your old designs
I know what it feels like to look at your early days of design and think “Oh my! What was I thinking?! I need to get rid of that immediately”, but it is important to keep that work. It will help you see if you’re moving forward and improving your skills. Instead of throwing away or deleting old projects, try reworking them.

Take classes
Many local colleges allow you to register for classes without enrolling full-time. It will not only teach you some new things technically, but also put you back in a classroom of your peers.

Learn something new
Whenever I am in a creative slump I try something new or do something completely unrelated to design. Getting your mind off things and into something new, usually has a funny way of working itself back around.

Grab a sketchbook
Helps you work through ideas quickly and without limitations of design software. Has made a HUGE difference in my designs.

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