Posts Tagged ‘clear’

Horse etched wineglass back-lighted on black background.

Photographing glass objects can be quite challenging, but there are some basic techniques that can be used to achieve fantastic results and with limited effort. Photographing glass doesn’t require expensive equipment for backdrops or even cameras themselves; it simply takes a basic understanding of how light disperses through glass and the best techniques for capturing that light in the most flattering way possible.

Graduated Background


A continuous tone background, also known as a graduated background, is a method for photographing glass objects that is popular with many industry professionals. A close examination of  any trade magazine or other publications will reveal how effective and simple this technique is. The continuous tone background allows the photographer to create an illusion of light fading into darkness as it moves away from the glass art piece. These backgrounds can be created or used independently, but they are most effective when used in conjunction with an art photography cube. The glass object is placed within the cube among the background that is curved outward and upward to create the deeper illusion of surrounding the glass object itself. These photographic cubes are relatively inexpensive and make the process of photographing glass art much more effective.

Under-lighting for Special Effects


Using a light panel beneath the glass art will have a dramatic and lasting impact on the images that are created of the glass object. This technique is ideal for clear glass objects that allow light to penetrate and travel up and through the glass to illuminate the artwork evenly. A panel light can be used independently of a cube, but is recommended that the two be used harmoniously. Under-lighting will create a natural graduated background that will bring out the natural tone and texture of the clear and transparent glass object.

Back-lighting with a Black Background


If the glass object that you have is clear, then a strong back-lighting with a black background (see photo of the Horse Etched Wineglass) will highlight the sensitive textures, cuts, and lines of the glass-work. Again, a photographer’s cube is the best solution for bringing this technique to its highest measure and achievement. Place a small black background strip in the center of the cube and add a strong lighting source behind it. Within the cube, the light will capture the best essence of the glass art. These are just a few of the techniques for photographing glass objects that I’ve tried.

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