Photography: Rules Of Space

Posted: March 1, 2012 in Photography
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
English: A portable folding reflector position...

Image via Wikipedia

Today we’re gonna talk about space in photography, Rules of Space. Everybody needs space, so does the subject in your photos. This is a rule in photography more commonly known as the rule of space. This rule states that if the subject is not looking directly to the camera, or looks out of the frame, there should be enough space for the subject to look into. This technique creates intrigue in the minds of the viewers. Studies show that people viewing this kind of image will naturally look at the area where the subject is looking at.

If you are taking pictures of moving objects like bicycles, cars, running animals and people, the image should present the moving object with more active space and less dead space. The active space is the area where the object is facing and the dead space is the area behind the subject. This strategy builds impact, shows the expression that the object is actually moving and has a destination. This also enables viewers to instinctively look to where the object is heading, thus, building excitement within the image and sets its mood. Not only does it add dramatic accents in your photos, but it also creates a flow to naturally drag the attention of viewers to the direction of the subject.

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Comments
  1. I don’t understand this part, “If you are taking pictures of moving objects like bicycles, cars, running animals and people, the image should present the moving object with more active space and less dead space. The active space is the area where the object is facing and the dead space is the area behind the subject. ”

    Are you talking about negative space?

    You’d do well to provide more visual examples for your readers.

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